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Bibil Identifier bibil:249528
Publication Type Journal article
Title (English, Long) Finitude, Phenomenology, and Theology in Heidegger's Sein und Zeit
Author Dika, Tarek R.
Journal Harvard Theological Review (Volume: 110, Issue: 4)
Year (Publication) 2017
Year (Original (1st Edition)) 2017
Year (Copyright) 2017
Year (Reference) 2017
Language English
Pages 475-493 Pages
Genre Original
Abstract Any purely phenomenological description of the human being as in some sense “finite” must avail itself of a concept of finitude that does not rely, implicitly or explicitly, on the concept of God. Theologically motivated descriptions, however, face no such dilemma; they can and, indeed, must avail themselves of some concept of the human creature as a finite being created in God's image (Gen 1:27 KJV). For there to be a meaningful difference between these two descriptions, the concept of finitude common to both must have a different sense in each. These are some of the methodological requirements Heidegger lays down in Sein und Zeit §10: “The Delimitation [Abgrenzung] of Phenomenology from Anthropology, Psychology, and Biology.” Heidegger's strategy for distinguishing the analytic of Dasein, in which the concept of finitude (Endlichkeit) plays a foundational role, from what he refers to as “the anthropology of Christianity” consists in distinguishing between two concepts of finitude: (1) finitude as lack or imperfection, defined as ens finitum relative to God as ens infinitum, and (2) an original concept of finitude, which, not being defined relative to God, is purely phenomenological and constitutes the horizon of any and all understanding of Being.
DOI 10.1017/S0017816017000232
Keywords Thesaurus BiBIL : Bible (as a whole) : History of Interpretation and Reception : Important Persons : 20th century : Heidegger, Martin
Links Online document (HTML, English)
Last modification 2018-12-03