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Bibil Identifier bibil:239539
Publication Type Book
Title (English, Long) The Reformed David(s) and the Question of Resistance to Tyranny
Title (English, ) Reading the Bible in the 16th and 17th Centuries
Author DeLapp, Nevada Levi
Series Scriptural Traces: Critical Perspectives on the Reception and Influence of the Bible (Volume: 3)
Series Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (Volume: 601)
Year (Publication) 2014
Year (Original (1st Edition)) 2014
Year (Copyright) 2014
Year (Reference) 2014
Library BCU/Dorigny, Lausanne
Signature USA 22065
Place 23 "15/16"
Publishing house Bloomsbury
Place London et al.
ISBN 978-0-567-65548-6
Edition number 1
Language English
Pages xiv Pages
234 Pages
height in cm 24
Genre Original
Abstract This study centers on the question: how do particular readers read a biblical passage? What factors govern each reading? DeLapp here attempts to set up a test case for observing how both socio-historical and textual factors play a part in how a person reads a biblical text. Using a reception-historical methodology, he surveys five Reformed authors and their readings of the David and Saul story (primarily 1 Sam 24 and 26). From this survey two interrelated phenomena emerge. First, all the authors find in David an ideal model for civic praxis-a “Davidic social imaginary” (Charles Taylor). Second, despite this primary agreement, the authors display two different reading trajectories when discussing David's relationship with Saul. Some read the story as showing a persecuted exile, who refuses to offer active resistance against a tyrannical monarch. Others read the story as exemplifying active defensive resistance against a tyrant.
To account for this convergence and divergence in the readings, DeLapp argues for a two-fold conclusion. The authors are influenced both by their socio-historical contexts and by the shape of the biblical text itself. Given a Deuteronomic frame conducive to the social imaginary, the paradigmatic narratives of 1 Sam 24 and 26 offer a narrative gap never resolved. The story never makes explicit to the reader what David is doing in the wilderness in relation to King Saul. As a result, the authors fill in the “gap” in ways that accord with their own socio-historical experiences.
Keywords Thesaurus BiBIL : Old Testament (Introduction) : Theology : Themes : David
Thesaurus BiBIL : Bible (as a whole) : History of Interpretation and Reception : Important Persons : Renaissance - Reformation (15th -16th cent.)
Thesaurus BiBIL : Bible (as a whole) : History of Interpretation and Reception : Important Persons : 17th century
Pericopes 1 Samuel 24-26
Last modification 2017-10-27