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Bibil Identifier bibil:239455
Publication Type Book
Title (French, Long) Mapping the "Apocalypse of Paul": Geography, Genre and History
Author Copeland, Kirsti Barrett
Year (Publication) 2001
Year (Original (1st Edition)) 2001
Year (Copyright) 2001
Year (Reference) 2001
Library BCU/Dorigny, Lausanne
Signature USA 21744
Department Magasin 3
Publishing house Princeton University Press
Place Princeton
ISBN 9780493164663
Edition number 1
Language English
Pages ix Pages
323 Pages
height in cm 22
Genre Reprint
Notes Reproduit à partir d'un microfilm
Abstract The Apocalypse of Paul is an elaboration on Paul's journey to the heavens in 2 Corinthians 12:2-4. Originally composed in Greek, it is extant in more than a dozen languages and over 300 manuscripts. This dissertation uses the apocalyptic geography of the Apocalypse of Paul to examine questions concerning its genre, intellectual history and social context. The first chapter considers the preface of the Apocalypse of Paul and its implications for the date of the apocalypse. It argues that the preface belongs to the text, and that the entire text was composed at the end of the fourth century in Egypt. The second chapter shows that the author of the Apocalypse of Paul uses the apocalyptic genre to adapt the image of the Homeric River Ocean from the site of muthos into the locus of revelation. This adaptation is similar to Plato's (5th /4th c. BCE, Athens) transformation of Ocean in the service of philosophy and appears in the work of other late antique Christians, such as Ephrem (5th c. CE, Syria) and Cosmas Indicopleustas (6th c. CE, Alexandria). The third chapter shows the implications of the portrayal of the millennium in the Apocalypse of Paul as distant space, not distant time. These millennial lands are distinct from those of Irenaeus (2nd c. CE, Asia Minor), altered in part in reaction to Origen's (3rd c. CE, Alexandria) challenge to the millennialists. The fourth chapter argues that the description of the City of Christ in the Apocalypse of Paul combines the traditional Jewish and Christian imagery of the Heavenly Jerusalem with the earthly ideal of the Egyptian monastery, attested by Shenoute (5 th c. CE, Egypt). Through comparison with the bishop of Alexandria, Athanasius (4th c. CE), the fifth chapter suggests that the Apocalypse of Paul was composed by a monk and not a priest or bishop. In the process of mapping the Apocalypse of Paul, this study of apocalyptic geography offers insight into late antique beliefs about the fate of the soul after death. The dissertation includes a transcription and translation of the Coptic version of the Apocalypse of Paul. Abstract: The Apocalypse of Paul is an elaboration on Paul's journey to the heavens in 2 Corinthians 12:2-4. Originally composed in Greek, it is extant in more than a dozen languages and over 300 manuscripts. This dissertation uses the apocalyptic geography of the Apocalypse of Paul to examine questions concerning its genre, intellectual history and social context. The first chapter considers the preface of the Apocalypse of Paul and its implications for the date of the apocalypse. It argues that the preface belongs to the text, and that the entire text was composed at the end of the fourth century in Egypt. The second chapter shows that the author of the Apocalypse of Paul uses the apocalyptic genre to adapt the image of the Homeric River Ocean from the site of muthos into the locus of revelation. This adaptation is similar to Plato's (5th /4th c. BCE, Athens) transformation of Ocean in the service of philosophy and appears in the work of other late antique Christians, such as Ephrem (5th c. CE, Syria) and Cosmas Indicopleustas (6th c. CE, Alexandria). The third chapter shows the implications of the portrayal of the millennium in the Apocalypse of Paul as distant space, not distant time. These millennial lands are distinct from those of Irenaeus (2nd c. CE, Asia Minor), altered in part in reaction to Origen's (3rd c. CE, Alexandria) challenge to the millennialists. The fourth chapter argues that the description of the City of Christ in the Apocalypse of Paul combines the traditional Jewish and Christian imagery of the Heavenly Jerusalem with the earthly ideal of the Egyptian monastery, attested by Shenoute (5 th c. CE, Egypt). Through comparison with the bishop of Alexandria, Athanasius (4th c. CE), the fifth chapter suggests that the Apocalypse of Paul was composed by a monk and not a priest or bishop. In the process of mapping the Apocalypse of Paul, this study of apocalyptic geography offers insight into late antique beliefs about the fate of the soul after death. The dissertation includes a transcription and translation of the Coptic version of the Apocalypse of Paul.
Keywords Thesaurus BiBIL : Unbound Keywords : Geography
Thesaurus BiBIL : Milieu : Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha : Apocryphal Texts relating to New Testament Characters or Events : Apocalypses : Apocalypse of Paul / Visio Pauli
Thesaurus BiBIL : Ancient Christianity : Themes : Eschatology
Thesaurus BiBIL : Ancient Christianity : Themes : Asceticism
Thesaurus BiBIL : Ancient Christianity : Themes : Bishop / Episkopos
Thesaurus BiBIL : Ancient Christianity : Ancient Christian Literature : Texts and Authors (Church Fathers) : Texts and Authors : Athanasius
Last modification 2017-10-27